People

Faculty

Kate Baldwin

Kate Baldwin, Ph.D., Columbia University, 2010, is an assistant professor of political science. Her research focuses political accountability, state-building and the politics of development, with a regional focus on sub-Saharan Africa. Her research has appeared in the American Political Science Review, the American Journal of Political Science, and Comparative Politics. She teaches classes on African Politics, the politics of social welfare provision in developing countries, and research design in comparative politics. She is also affiliated with the Institution for Social and Policy Studies and the MacMillan Center for International and Area Studies.

Campus address: 115 Prospect Street

Phone: (203) 432-1736


Deborah Beim

Deborah Beim is an Assistant Professor in the Political Science department at Yale University. She studies American politics in general and judicial politics in particular, with a focus on interactions between the U.S. Supreme Court and the Courts of Appeals. Her research has explored the role of the lower courts in doctrinal development and the informational value of dissenting opinions. She teaches courses on game theory, American politics, and judicial politics. She earned a BA in Political Science from Columbia in 2008 and PhD in Politics from Princeton in 2013. 

 

Campus address: 77 Prospect Street, Room C124


Alexandre Debs

Alexandre Debs, Ph.D., MIT, 2007, is an Associate Professor of Political Science. His research focuses on the causes of interstate war, nuclear proliferation, and democratization. His previous work has appeared or is forthcoming in the American Political Science Review, International OrganizationInternational SecurityInternational Studies Quarterly, the Journal of Conflict Resolution, and the Quarterly Journal of Political Science, among other outlets. He is the author of the book Nuclear Politics: The Strategic Causes of Proliferation (with Nuno Monteiro). He teaches courses on nuclear politics and game theory. 

Campus address: 115 Prospect Street, Room 311


Ana De La O

Ana L. De La O, is associate professor of Political Science at Yale University, where she is affiliated with the MacMillan Center for International and Area Studies, the Institution of Social and Policy Studies, and the Jackson Institute for Global Affairs. Her research relates to the political economy of poverty alleviation, clientelism and the provision of public goods. She is author of Crafting Policies to End Poverty in Latin America (Forthcoming, Cambridge University Press). Her articles have appeared in the American Journal of Political Science, the Journal of Politics, Comparative Political Studies, the Quarterly Journal of Political Science, and the Annals of the American Academy of Political and Social Sciences. She earned her PhD in Political Science from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. She teaches courses on the political economy of poverty alleviation, paradigms of political economy, the politics of redistribution, and quantitative research methods.

Campus address: 77 Prospect Street, C122
Phone: (203) 432-5234


Alan Gerber

Alan Gerber, Ph.D., MIT, 1994 is the Dilley Professor of Political Science and Professor of Economics (by courtesy) at Yale University, where he is also Director of the Center for the Study of American Politics. He is a Fellow of the American Academy of Political and Social Science and of the American Academy of Arts and Science. His research and teaching focuses on experimental methods, statistics, and American politics. He has published in numerous academic journals, including the American Political Science Review, American Journal of Political Science, and the Journal of Politics, as well as the Proceedings of the National Academy of Science.

Campus address: 77 Prospect Street
Phone: (203) 432-5232


Johannes HörnerJohannes Hörner, PhD, University of Pennsylvania 2000 is Professor of Economics at the Department of Economics, and member of the Cowles Foundation. He is a Fellow of the Econometric Society, and a council member of the game theory society. His research interest include repeated games, dynamic games, and games of incomplete information. He has written numerous articles for a variety of economics journals, including the American Economic Review, Econometrica, the Journal of Political Economy, The Review of Economic Studies and The Quarterly Journal of Economics.
 
 

Giovanni Maggi

Giovanni Maggi, Ph.D., Stanford University, 1994, is the Howard H. Leach Professor of Economics & International Affairs. He is a faculty research associate at the National Bureau of Economic Research. His research and teaching interests include international trade and political economy. He has written numerous articles for a variety of economics journals, including the American Economic Review, the Journal of Political Economy and The Quarterly Journal of Economics.

Campus address: Rosenkranz Hall, Room 334
Phone: (203) 432-3569


Mushfiq Mobarak

Mushfiq Mobarak is a Professor in the department of economics and at the School of Management at Yale. He is a development economist with interests in environmental issues. Professor Mobarak has several ongoing research projects in Bangladesh, Indonesia, India and Malawi. He conducts field experiments exploring ways to induce people in developing countries to adopt technologies or behaviors that are likely to be welfare improving. He also studies political reactions when development interventions are scaled up. Professor Mobarak is Faculty Director of the Yale Research Initiative on Innovation and Scale (Y-RISE) at the Macmillan Center. He also co-chairs the Urban Services Initiative and the Environment & Energy Sector work at the Jameel Poverty Action Lab (J-PAL) at MIT, and is the academic lead for the Bangladesh Research Program for the ‘International Growth Centre (IGC)’ at LSE and Oxford.  He has previously worked at the World Bank and at the International Monetary Fund.


Gerard Padro-i-Miquel 

Bio forthcoming


Didac Queralt

Didac Queralt, Ph.D., NYU, 2012, is an Assistant Professor of Political Science. His research examines the origins of fiscal institutions from three different angles: war, trade, and international finance. His research has appeared in the Quarterly Journal of Political Science, International Studies Quarterly, and Comparative Political Studies, among other outlets. He teaches courses on International Political Economy and State Formation.


John Roemer

John Roemer, Ph.D., University of California, Berkeley, (Economics), 1974, is the Elizabeth S. and A. Varick Professor of Political Science and Economics. He is a Fellow of the Econometric Society, the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, and a corresponding fellow of the British Academy. His research concerns political economy, distributive justice, the ethics and economics of climate change, and socialism.  He is currently teaching Political Competition,  theories of distributive justice, and a seminar on Equality.  Publications include: Political Competition, Harvard University Press, 2001; Equality of Opportunity, Harvard University Press, 1998, A future for socialism, Harvard University Press, 1994, and Theories of Distributive Justice, Harvard University Press, 1996.   His forthcoming book (Yale University Press) How we cooperate: A Kantian approach to optimization,  provides micro-foundations for how people organize economic cooperation among themselves in a decentralized fashion. 

Campus address: 115 Prospect Street, Room 313
Phone: (203) 432-5249


Susan Rose-Ackerman

Susan Rose-AckermanHenry R. Luce Professor Emerita. Professor Rose-Ackerman has written widely on administrative law, corruption, federalism, and law and economics. Her recent books are Corruption and Government: Causes, Consequences and Reform, 2d edition (with Bonnie J. Palifka, 2016);  Due Process of Lawmaking (with Stefanie Egidy and James Fowkes, 2015); Comparative Administrative Law, 2d edition (editor with Peter Lindseth and Blake Emerson, 2017); Anti-Corruption Policy: Can International Actors Play a Constructive Role? (editor with Paul Carrington 2013):  International Handbook on the Economics of Corruption (vol. I, editor, 2006; vol. II, editor with Tina Søreide, 2011); From Elections to Democracy: Building Accountable Government in Hungary and Poland (2005);  and Controlling Environmental Policy: The Limits of Public Law in Germany and the United States (1995). Her current research and teaching interests are the political economy of corruption, the comparative study of administrative law and public policy with a focus on the United States and Western Europe. She directs the program in Comparative Administrative Law at Yale Law School and has been a fellow at the Wissenschaftskolleg, Berlin; Science Po, Paris, and the Institute for Advanced Study in the Behavioral Sciences, Stanford. She holds a B.A. from Wellesley College and a Ph.D. from Yale University.

Campus address: Law School, 217 Wall Street, Room 217
Phone: (203) 432-4891


Frances Rosenbluth

Frances McCall RosenbluthPh.D., Columbia University, 1988, is the Damon Wells Professor of Political Science. She is a comparative political economist with current research interests in the politics and political economy of Japan, the political economy of gender, war and politics, and party competition.  Her most recent books are Responsible Parties: Saving Democracy from Itself (with Ian Shapiro, Yale University Press, 2018), Forged Through Fire: War, Peace, and the Democratic Bargain (with John Ferejohn, Norton 2017); Japan Transformed (with Michael Thies, Princeton University Press, 2010); Women, Work, and Politics (with Torben Iversen, Yale University Press, 2010), and War and Statebuilding in Medieval Japan (co-edited with John Ferejohn, Stanford University Press, 2010)

Campus address: 31 Hillhouse Avenue, Room 102
Phone: (203) 687-9585


Christian Salas, Ph.D., University of Chicago, 2017, is a Post-doctoral Associate and Lecturer in the Leitner Program in International and Comparative Political Economy. His research focuses on electoral accountability,  the causes and consequences of party fragmentation, and strategic communication in politics. He teaches game theory.

 
Campus address: 115 Prospect Street, Room 436

Milan SvolikMilan Svolik, Ph.D., University of Chicago, 2006, is a Professor of Political Science at Yale University. His research and teaching focuses on comparative politics, political economy, and formal political theory. Svolik has authored and co-authored articles on the politics of authoritarian regimes and democratization in leading political science journals, including the American Political Science Review, the American Journal of Political Science, and the Journal of Politics. He is the author of The Politics of Authoritarian Rule (Cambridge University Press, 2012), which received the best book award from the Comparative Democratization Section of the American Political Science Association.
 

Campus address: 330 Rosenkranz Hall, 115 Prospect
Website:
http://campuspress.yale.edu/svolik/


Ian Turner Ian Turner, Ph.D., Washington University in St. Louis, 2015, is an Assistant Professor of Political Science at Yale University, where he is also affiliated with the Institution of Social and Policy Studies and the Center for the Study of American Politics. His current research and teaching interests focus on issues of democratic accountability. In particular, his current research examines how interactions between bureaucratic agencies and other institutions structure policymaking incentives, and the role lobbying and campaign finance play in influencing political behavior and public policy. He teaches courses on the politics of bureaucracy, money and influence in American politics, and formal models of accountability and representation.

Ebonya Washington

Ebonya Washington, PhD MIT 2003, is Professor of Economics.  Her political economy work focuses on the representation and political efficacy of low-income and minority Americans and the psychological motivations and consequences of political participation. Professor Washington also studies the financial behavior of low-income Americans. Her work has appeared in the American Economic Review and the Quarterly Journal of Economics among other publications.

Campus address: 37 Hillhouse Avenue, Room 36
Phone: (203) 432-9901